Author: PJ Janssen

Horse treats

Horse treats   Most people occasionally give their horse treats. How you give your horse treats, depends on the horse. Some horses are fine, while other horses get nippy. If your horse gets nippy or pushy, it me be a good idea to limit his/her treats, or put them in his feed bucket.   If you feed treats by hand always keep your hand flat so your horse cannot get your fingers mixed up with the treat. (ouch )   Treats can be an effective training tool. Many people use them to get their horses to do their stretching exercises or learn tricks. They can also be used as a reward for a job well done, or to help you catch them in the field.   Treats can be anything from sugar cubes, apples & carrots, to commercially made treats. If you chose commercially made treats, there is a wide variety from which to choose. Some treats are soft and have peppermints or sugar cubes inside; others are made with molasses and oats. Some have no sugar added while others include sugar. Your horses age and teeth may help determine whether you should give him/her hard or soft treats.   If your horse needs to limit his/her sugar intake, you may wish to try beet treats, or treats with no or limited added sugar. Read the label to find...

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Fly Control

Fly control Flies and other insects can be a big problem around a barn. In order to control them, you have to attack them on many fronts. One big thing you can do is to keep the barn area clean. Manure draws flies. Make sure you keep your stalls and surrounding area free of manure and soiled bedding. Keep your manure pile as far from the barn as possible Another thing you can do is to get rid of standing water. Make sure you change the water in your troughs often, dump out buckets and tubs, and watch for standing water after a rain. To protect your horse from insects, many people use fly masks, fly sheets, fly boots, fly spray and more. When selecting a fly spray, get one that is right for you and your horse. Try to get one that targets the insects you wish to control and is appropriate for your horse’s situation. If you horse is working hard, or outside, try a sweat resistant spray. If your horse has sensitive skin, an all-natural spray, or a fly sheet may work best.  Make sure you follow directions for how much and how often to apply. Pay particular attention to lower legs.       When applying to the face, roll ons or creams may work best. There are also special fly control products for wounds....

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Crochet ear nets or ear bonnets.

Crochet ear nets or ear bonnets got their start with jumpers. They were used to keep gnats and flies from distracting horses while jumping. Most had tassels on them to help swish flies. Now, they have a multitude of uses. Keeping earplugs in, keeping bugs out, adding some pizzazz to an ensemble (matching pad and bonnet) some even have material in the ears to dampen sound. When looking for a ear net, make sure it fits well. Make sure the ear hoods are big enough for your horse’s ears. If they are too snug, they can be distracting to the horse. If your horse has never worn an ear net, try it at home before heading out to a show or event. Let him/her get used to it. Ear nets now come in many sizes and colors, with and without tassels. You can even add some bling to your bonnet. Most saddle pad manufactures make ear nets to match their pads.Ear nets are allowed in jumping classes, eventing and sometimes dressage. It is best to check the rules to see if they are allowed in your class or event...

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How to measure your horse for a blanket/sheet

  To measure your horse, use a tape measure and measure from the center of their chest, to their tail.  The number of inches is your blanket size.  Ex. Your horse measures 78″ from the center of his/her chest to his/her tail.  Your blanket size should be 78. Click here for video on measuring Click here to see our blanket...

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Sports/Compression Bras. An important part of your wardrobe

Don’t forget an important part of your riding wardrobe. Going without the correct support can cause breast pain and upper back and shoulder problems. Breasts are mostly composed of fatty tissue. Mainly skin and fragile ligaments called Coopers’ ligaments support breasts. Because these ligaments are not elastic, during repetitive or high impact sport the breasts bounce and pull on the ligaments, forcing them to stretch. A Sport Bra or Compression Bra is an important part of your riding wear. Balanced weight distribution of breast tissue is important. In a sport that emphasises control and stillness, bouncing breasts are distracting to say the...

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