Author: PJ Janssen

Cribbing

Cribbing Cribbing is the gnawing or chewing of wood. The horse often arches his neck and sucks in air as he cribs. This chewing of wood can wear down the teeth and destroy property. Does your horse crib? There are many different ways to try to stop a horse from cribbing. There are cribbing collars, cribbing products and even supplements that can stop cribbing. Some people think cribbing is related to stress. Try to minimize your horses stress by letting him/her out to graze and forage. Horses kept in stalls for much of the day may crib more than those that are let out. Horses with ulcers may crib more than those without ulcers. Once the ulcers are treated, the behavior often stops or is reduced. Your vet may be able to tell you if your horse has ulcers.   There is the thought that some minerals may be missing from the cribbers diet. Make sure your horse has a well-balanced food and supplement it if needed. Access to a salt/mineral block could also help. Check with your vet before you change your horses diet.     Your horse just may be bored and cribbing is something to do. If your horse has to be confined for long periods of time, try giving him/her some toys to keep them occupied. Access to hay can also help.      ...

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Girth Fit & Saddle Cleaning

Tips on Girth Sizing Girth Sizing – With the shorter billets of many jumping saddles, it is important that a girth of a sufficient length is used so that the buckles of it will land high enough up on the billets. Basically, you want the buckles closer to behind the knee rather than right next to the rider’s calf. Besides being more comfortable for the rider (have you ever ridden with the buckles RIGHT under your lower leg?!), it will also eliminate excessive flap wear from buckle friction. The hand on the flap is placed directly on the buckles, showing how proper placement will not interfere with the leg or cause undue wear to the flap. Let’s Clean! It is literally a question that we get DAILY from our customers, we figured it would be a good idea to cover it. As we all know, good tack is NOT cheap. If you are spending money on the good stuff, it only makes sense to treat them as an investment, and care for them accordingly, so that they can give you a good return. Additionally, the advents in tanning have changed the leather, making the “days of yore” care regime out of touch with modern leathers. There are 3 basic steps to caring for your fine leather goods: Cleaning, Conditioning and Safekeeping.   CLEANING: The easiest, most efficient way to...

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Riding Helmets – Fit

Riding Helmets   You know you should wear one, but do you know how it should fit? You want your helmet to be snug, but not so tight that it gives you a headache.   A well fitting helmet will not move or bobble on your head. The brim should be about an inch above your eyebrows. When properly adjusted, if you try to wiggle the helmet, your eyebrows should move with the hat.   When first putting a helmet on, make sure if it has a dial, the dial is opened all the way. Also, make sure the chinstraps are adjusted so that you will be able to snap it. After placing it on your head, turn the fitting dial, if so equipped, in to make it snug. Do not try to get a helmet with “room to grow” and just dial it down smaller. The helmet should fit with minimal adjustment. If it is a sized helmet with no dial, make sure it is snug enough, as some of them will settle and become a bit larger after wear. When your helmet is on, you should not be able to put your fingers in spaces on the side of the helmet, if you can, the helmet is too round for you. You may need to find a helmet that comes in long oval. Some people may have...

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Differences and Similarities between Traditional Dressage and Western Dressage by Coeli Netsky

I am often asked, what is Western Dressage and how does it compare to Traditional Dressage?  Dressage training is based on using The Dressage Training Scale , Rhythm , Relaxation , Connection , Impulsion , Straightness ,  and Collection .  Both Traditional and Western Dressage use the same dressage ring and placement of the letters .  They also use both sizes of the dressage ring according to what tests are being ridden , the large ring is 66 x 190 , the small ring is 66 x 120 . In the lower level tests for each may be performed in the smaller ring ,  but at  higher level tests must be in the large ring.  Besides the difference in the saddles and tack the core of the training is based on the Dressage Training Scale.  These are the similarities you will find in both dressage disciplines. The differences are the tests , the movements , the gaits , and the tack. In western dressage we do not expect or ask the western horse to look like a traditional Warmblood in its gaits or movements .  The western dressage horse is a stock type , working ranch horse , and dressage helps to marry the principles of The Training Scale to the working western horse by improving their overall suppleness , impulsion,  and harmony with their rider.   In fact...

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Horse colors

Horse Colors Horses can be found with a wide variety of coat colors. Some horses are mostly one color, while some horses have multiple colors. Most horses have at least some white such as a blaze, or snip or a white sock. A blaze is a wide white stripe on the horses face. A snip would be a small white marking on the muzzle not connected to any other face markings. Horses can also have a star, which is a white marking on the forehead. If a horse is said to be bald, it just means the white covers most of his face, possibly covering the eyes. Socks are white markings that usually include the fetlock joint. Legs can also have stockings, which usually go up to or include the knee. A coronet is just a thin band of white just above the hoof. Some common horse colors are bay, chestnut, palomino, white and black. The more common colors are listed below. There are more colors than we have listed.   Bay horses have brown bodies and black manes and tails, black points on their legs and face. Chestnut horses have red coats. They can have a lighter coat, called sorrel to a darker liver chestnut color Black horses, if a true black, have no brown hairs. They almost have a sort of blue hue to their coat. Seal...

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